Celebrating Chinese Australian History – a Timeline 1829 to 2017

Celebrating Chinese Australian History – a Timeline 1829 to 2017

Excluding Great Britain, Chinese are the oldest continuous immigrants to Australia beginning some in the early 1800’s. Their contribution to Australian society is immense and spans many fields over most all of Australia’s modern history.

1829 – Fifty-five Chinese migrated to Australia.

1848 – On 2nd October the ship Nimrod arrived from Xiamen with 120 Chinese followed by another ship, the Phillip Laing with 123 Chinese aboard.

1851 – 393 Chinese arrived at Hobart. 225 Chinese arrived at Moreton Bay. A person of note at this time is Louis Ah Mouy who sent a letter to his hometown explaining of the gold that was being found in Victoria. 50000 Chinese arrived in China between 1851–56 to work in the goldfields predominantly in Bendigo and Ballarat. Louis Ah Mouy became a prosperous gold merchant. read more

Nanjing Massacre Memorial Hall

Nanjing Massacre Memorial Hall

In 1937/38  Nanjing was witness to one of the worlds haunting events, being the massacre of some 300000 people at the hands of invading forces. At that time Nanjing was the capital of China and Japanese forces had taken control of the city and during the first six to eight weeks of their occupation had performed indescribable atrocities according to Chinese reports.

The memorial was built in 1985 and later updated and expanded to cover 28000 square meters. It’s located on the original site where the holocaust took place. read more

Nanjing Museum

Nanjing Museum

The Nanjing Museum is quite famous having had many exhibitions abroad and well known for holding some quite rare and valuable pieces of Chinas history, so, better take a look.

The museum features several halls all with different themes including an ancient Chinese jade exhibit, ancient Chinese silk, Chinese copper and bronze works, Ming and Qing period porcelain works and more. There was also a Chinese Lacquering exhibit, which at first doesn’t sound that interesting until you see that some of the items on display date back thousands of years. read more